Arrests at Hungary gay rights march

Police intervene as right-wing groups attack gay pride marchers in Budapest.

    At least 10 people were injured in
    the violence [Reuters]

    Eggs, firecrackers and cobblestones were also thrown at the about 450 marchers and police.

    A police car carrying Katalin Levai, a European parliament member and human rights activist, was attacked by anti-gay demonstrators.

    A stone was slammed through the window of the car but she was unhurt.

    Levai said: "This is outrageous and shameful that some 20 years after the change of regime, this is what we have ... such intolerance."

    'Intolerance'

    Istvan Ruzsacz, 32-year-old book editor who took part in the parade, said: "This [violence] is sad. Those people simply don't accept that gays exist and use this as an opportunity to advertise themselves."

    Gabor Horn, a politician, was also attacked and a police car carrying Gabor Szetey - the first openly gay Hungarian politician - was also targeted.

    Homosexuality was legalised in Eastern Europe after the collapse of communism in 1989 and Hungary legalised registered partnerships of same-sex couples last year.

    A number of European countries have seen gay rights marches in recent days, with parades in the Czech Republic and Bulgaria last weekend marred by attacks.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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