Vatican steps into veil debate

A cardinal says 'guests' must follow the laws of their host country, including the banning of veils.

    Martino said 'guests' from a different culture must respect the traditions ... of the countries they go to

    Vatican Radio reiterated the stance, saying that "the question of the veil for Islamic women" should be "considered in the context of respect for the laws of the countries which welcome them".

    Cultural traditions

    Martino's comments come two weeks before the pope begins a visit to Turkey.

    "Dialogue is needed with our brothers"

    Cardinal Renato Martino, former Vatican envoy to the UN

    Send us your views

    Although a secular state, Turkey has long wrestled over whether Muslim women should wear Islamic headscarves in such places as universities and public offices, where the article of clothing has been banned for many years.

    Flanking the cardinal, Agostino Marchetto, another Vatican official who deals with immigration issues, referred to Italy's law requiring people to keep their faces visible in public.

    The law dates to Italy's crackdown on domestic terrorism several decades ago.

    Marchetto said Italy "rightly" has such a law and that obeying it is "part of accepting the law of this country".

    Marchetto said: "Dialogue is needed with our brothers to make them understand the consequences of some of their desires, such as their own cultural and religious traditions, would not be positive in the society they are now in."

    Martino also pushed the Vatican's campaign for Christians' right to worship around the world.

    He lamented that some countries do not allow immigrants from Christian countries to profess their faith easily.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.