Afghan soldiers die in Kabul suicide bombing

Taliban claims responsibility for attack on bus in Afghan capital that left 11 people dead and 13 others wounded.

    The Taliban claimed responsibility for Wednesday's attack in Kabul via a spokesman [AFP]
    The Taliban claimed responsibility for Wednesday's attack in Kabul via a spokesman [AFP]

    A Taliban suicide bomber has struck a bus carrying Afghan military personnel in Kabul killing at least 11 people, officials say.

    The blast on Wednesday targeted a bus, blowing out the windows and leaving the interior spattered with blood.

    Afghan soldiers cordoned off the scene as the bus was lifted by a crane to be carried away.

    The bombing came as the country continues to struggle through its first democratic transition of power, with electoral officials announcing on Wednesday that the release of initial election results were to postponed until next week due to allegations of fraud.

    General Mohammad Zahir Azimi, a Defence Ministry spokesman, said eight army soldiers were killed and 13 others wounded in the blast.

    Three civilians were also killed, according to Kabul's criminal investigation chief Gul Agha Hashim.

    Army General Kadamshah Shahim said the bomber was stopped before he could enter the bus, preventing a higher casualty toll.

    The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack via Zabiullah Mujahid, a spokesman .

    Preliminary results from a June 14 run-off vote between Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai had been due on Wednesday.

    But the Independent Election Commission said they were being postponed until Monday so ballots from 1,930 polling stations in 30 provinces could be audited because of complaints about irregularities.

    The winner will replace President Hamid Karzai, the only leader the country has known since the 2001 US-led invasion that toppled the Taliban.

    He was constitutionally barred from seeking a third term.

    Western officials had hoped for a smooth transfer of power ahead of the withdrawal of US and allied combat troops by the end of this year.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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