Bangladesh court declares Jamaat illegal

High Court decision on country's biggest Islamist party takes it out of running in forthcoming elections.

    Bangladesh's High Court has declared the registration of Jamaat-e-Islami, the country's main Islamist party, is illegal, banning it from contesting January's general election.

    The court made the ruling  in the country's capital, Dhaka, on Thursday after a petition was lodged arguing that Jamaat's charter breached the constitution.

    "It is hereby declared illegal," said Moazzem Hossain, the chief judge hearing the case amid tight security outside the courthouse in Dhaka.

    Shahdeen Malik, a lawyer for the Bangladeshi election commission, which oversees preparations for elections due next January, said the ruling meant Jamaat could not field candidates.

    "As a party Jamaat's registration with the election commission is declared illegal, with the consequence that they cannot contest the election as a political party," Shahdeen Malik told AFP.

    "The party can still carry on with other political activities. If it amends its charter, to bring it in conformity with the constitution and reapplies for registration, it can be re-registered."

    Violence flared amid mass protests after the ruling.

    'Vehicles smashed'

    Police said that hundreds of activists blocked a major road and smashed vehicles in Pabna district, northwest of the capital.

    Further protests were anticipated throughout the afternoon and evening.

    Jamaat immediately appealed to the Supreme Court against the High Court verdict, senior defence lawyer Abdur Razzak said.

    The party would be barred from contesting elections if the Supreme Court upholds the verdict.

    The ruling comes after a leading Sufi group, which practises Islamic mysticism, filed the public interest litigation in January 2009 seeking to scrap Jamaat's registration.

    Secular protesters have long demanded that Jamaat be banned for its role in the 1971 war of independence, during which it opposed Bangladesh's breakaway from Pakistan.

    Top Jamaat leaders are being tried for crimes during the war and four of them have been sentenced to death for murder, mass murder, rape and religious persecution in Bangladesh's controversial International Crimes Tribunal, which is not endorsed by the UN and has been criticised by rights groups.

    Protests over the verdicts have sparked violence that has left at least 150 people dead during street clashes with security forces, Human Rights Watch said in a report released on Thursday.

    Jamaat has said that the trials are a sham aimed at eliminating the party, which is a key opposition force.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Meet the deported nurse aiding asylum seekers at US-Mexico border

    Meet the deported nurse helping refugees at the border

    Francisco 'Panchito' Olachea drives a beat-up ambulance around Nogales, taking care of those trying to get to the US.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.