Ban in India's tiger reserves hits tourism

From tens of thousands at the start of the 20th century, there are now only 1,870 left in India.

    India is home to half the world's tigers, whose numbers are rapidly dwindling.
     
    Now the country's highest court says the government is not doing enough to protect the endangered animals. So it has temporarily banned tourists from core areas inside tiger reserves.
     
    Tour operators say that puts their livelihoods at risk, while conservationists are saying responsible tourism may actually save the tiger.

    Al Jazeera's Prerna Suri reports from the Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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