Scores killed in Bangladesh floods | News | Al Jazeera

Scores killed in Bangladesh floods

Landslides and floods caused by monsoon rains have so far killed at least 106 people this week.

    Scores killed in Bangladesh floods
    Monsoon floods are common in Bangladesh, a delta nation of 160 million people [Getty Images]

    Searchers have pulled out 15 bodies buried under mud and debris after landslides and floods caused by monsoon rains in southern Bangladesh, raising the toll to 106 deaths this week.

    The landslides occurred mainly in remote villages with poor roads, making rescue work more difficult, and the flooding was disrupting communications.

    About 500 houses were washed away. More people may be missing, but officials said that had they do not know how many. Soldiers joined the search for the missing in three hard-hit districts and found 15 victims on Thursday.

    At least 41 died in Cox's Bazar, 41 in neighbouring Bandarban and another 24 in Chittagong, mostly in landslides, the disaster management ministry said.

    Three days of torrential rain in the region of small hills and forests dislodged huge chunks of earth, which buried flimsy huts where families were sleeping late on Tuesday and early Wednesday.

    In Bandarban, 11-year-old Rafiqul Islam was the only survivor in his family because he was visiting another relative when mud buried his hut. His parents and three siblings died.

    "The rain had kept me from returning home," the boy told The Associated Press news agency.

    Monsoon floods are common in Bangladesh, a delta nation of 160 million people.

    Volunteers using loudspeakers warned people about the danger of landslides during the rains, said Jaynul Bari, a government administrator in Cox's Bazar.

    Flood waters covered many roads and washed away a railway bridge, snapping road and rail links between Dhaka and the three districts. An airport in Chittagong was closed after floodwaters swamped its runway, but reopened Wednesday.

    The government said relief workers were distributing rice and water to hundreds of displaced people.

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    America's Guns: Secret Pipeline to Syria

    America's Guns: Secret Pipeline to Syria

    How has the international arms trade exacerbated conflict in the Middle East? People and Power investigates.

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    In 1959, a year before Nigeria's independence, a 23-year-old student helped colour the country's identity.