Displacement fuels India rebellion

Poor tribals displaced due to development projects are swelling the ranks of rebel Maoists.

    For the last four decades, India has been fighting against a rebellion by some of its poorest citizens.

    The Naxal movement is believed to have more than 20,000 fighters, and more than a million followers.

    Many of them are the victims of official corruption and land grabs by governments.

    Every development project, from roads to dams and industrial plants, have meant that poor tribals living in the rural interiors have had to move out of their land.

    The displaced millions are justifiably angry and now they form the backbone of the rebel movement.

    Kamal Kumar reports on their fight for land.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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