Mumbai defies threat over film

Shahrukh Khan's new film opens to packed theatres despite call for a boycott.

     Police have been deployed outside cinemas in many cities following the Shiv Sena's threats [AFP]

    The boycott demand did not dissuade film goers however, with tickets at the multiplexes that screened the first showings of the film reportedly selling out within hours.

    'Huge fan'

    "I came to see the movie because it's been so controversial, and because I am a huge fan of Shahrukh Khan," Subhash Kandrep, who was queueing outside one of the cinemas, was reported by the Reuters news agency as saying.

    "I don't see why a movie should not be shown just because some people are protesting over what Khan said"

    Subhash Kandrep,
    Shahrukh Khan fan

    "I don't see why a movie should not be shown just because some people are protesting over what Khan said."

    Shiv Sena mounted its protests after recent comments by Khan that Pakistani players should have been chosen to participate in the Indian Premier League Twenty20 cricket tournament to be held next month.

    Manohar Joshi, a senior Shiv Sena leader, who led a group of supporters to a film theatre, said that Shiv Sena would allow screenings but only after Khan apologises.

    Khan, who is Muslim, has refused to do so.

    Khan's new film is set in the US against the backdrop of the September 11 attacks on New York and traces the journey of a Muslim man who suffers from Asperger's syndrome.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.