Deaths in Pakistan missile strike

Training camp reportedly run by Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud targeted, killing 16 people.

    Tuesday's missile attack was the fourth against the Pakistani Taliban leader Mehsud in two weeks

    One official said communication intercepts indicated that fighters were now telling one another to move to safe places because there were more drones in the sky and there could be more attacks.

    In depth


     Profile: Baitullah Mehsud
     Profile: The Pakistan Taliban 
     Timeline: Pakistan under attack 
     
    Witness: Pakistan in crisis 
     
    Inside Story: Pakistan's military
     Riz Khan: The battle for the soul of Pakistan

    The officials said Mehsud was not among the victims.

    The US is thought to have launched more than 40 missiles against targets in the border area since last August, according to a count by The Associated Press.

    Washington does not directly acknowledge being responsible for launching the missiles, which kill civilians as well as armed groups and contribute to anti-US sentiment in Pakistan.

    Tuesday's attack was the fourth in two weeks against Mehsud and his followers in his stronghold of South Waziristan.

    One attack on the funeral of a dead fighter killed up to 80 people.

    Pakistan's army is deploying troops in South Waziristan and launching regular air strikes of its own to try and kill or capture Mehsud, who is blamed for organising many of the suicide attacks in Pakistan over the last few years.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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