Bomber hits Afghan district office

At least nine people killed and eight wounded in Dand, southern Afghanistan.

     

    The registration office is inside a Kandahar district government compound that includes administration offices, the police headquarters and a court.

    Cross-border support

    The interior ministry blamed the attack on the "enemies of Afghanistan", a term often used by Afghan officials to refer to fighters linked to the Taliban, behind a wave of violence that also has roots in neighbouring Pakistan.

    Three policemen were also killed on Monday in the eastern province of Paktia, bordering Pakistan, the interior ministry said.

    The ministry added that five "enemies of peace and stability" were also killed when bombs they were planting into roads in Khost province, also on the Pakistan border, blew up prematurely.

    The attack came as the Nato secretary-general said that internaional forces should not expect a quick withdrawal from Afghanistan.

    "In my opinion, it is necessary to stay in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future," Jaap de Hoop Scheffer said.

    "We will not be able to change Afghanistan into Switzerland in a few years time."

    Barack Obama, the US president, on Friday announced a revamped US strategy to deal with the escalating violence.

    The plan includes a greater focus on fighter sanctuaries across the border in Pakistan, an addition of 4,000 US military trainers to help the Afghan security forces and a ramping-up of civilian reconstruction efforts.

    About 90 states and international organisations will meet in The Netherlands on Tuesday to discuss the situation in Afghanistan.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.