Ex-PM's son 'quits Bangladesh'

Tareque Rahman travels for treatment to injuries he alleges occurred through torture.

    Rahman's lawyers allege that he was
    tortured while in custody [AFP]

    "He is very sick so he cannot perform all the political activities demanded by the role of senior joint general secretary. He needs long-term treatment to recover from his illness."

    According to medical reports released last month, Rahman was injured when he was strung up a wall and dropped, fracturing two bones in his back.

    The government has not commented on the torture allegations.

    Corruption allegations

    Zia has said that corruption allegations
    against her are politically motivated [AFP]

    Rahman's departure from Bangladesh came hours after a reunion with his mother, who was released from prison on Thursday after spending a year there, also on corruption charges.

    After visiting her son on Thursday, Zia said he would not return to politics until he was healthy.

    "He will stay abroad and out of politics until he recovers completely," Zia told reporters.

    "Doctors say it will take at least to three years to pull through."

    Rahman was arrested on corruption charges in March 2007 and despite being granted bail faces 13 charges of corruption.

    He has been accused of making millions of dollars for his own gain by influencing the awarding of state contracts during the BNP-led government's reign from 2001 to 2006.

    His lawyers have denied the allegations against him.

    Khaleda Zia, for her part, has claimed that the corruption charges imposed on her in September 2007 by Bangladesh’s military-backed interim government were an attempt to force her out of politics.

    But the simultaneous release of Zia and Rahman is being seen by analysts as a move by the interim government to ensure that the BNP party stands in December elections and show that it is keen to restore democracy to the country.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.