US allies lengthen Afghan tours

The Netherlands and Britain agree to yearly command stints in south of the country.

    The British army has committed to longer periods in command in southern Afghanistan [AFP]

    "We believe that this new arrangement - and our allies as well, because they have agreed to it - will provide greater predictability, continuity, stability in this volatile important region of Afghanistan," Morrell said.
     
    Continuity fears
     
    The commitment falls short of a proposal favoured by General Dan McNeill, the commander of the Nato-led force in Afghanistan, that a single country be put in charge of military operations in the south.

    McNeill and others have said that a lack of continuity has limited the effectiveness of the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) in the south.

    Not only do the commands currently change hands every nine months, but European troops that serve in the south rotate every three to six months.

    "It is sometimes a little difficult for [Afghan forces] to change from one culture to the next," McNeill said on Wednesday.

    Another unresolved issue is whether to continue having two US four-star generals responsible for the 33,000 US troops serving in Afghanistan.

    General John Bantz Craddock, Nato's supreme commander, is responsible for the 50,000-strong Isaf, which includes 15,000 US troops.

    General David Petraeus, who has been tapped to be the next head of the US Central Command, will be responsible for another 18,000 US troops conducting counter-terrorism and training missions in Afghanistan.

    "That is probably the last large remaining issue to be dealt with, whether it makes sense to ... dual-hat a commander down there or keep the command divided," Morrell said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    We explore how Salah Ed-Din unified the Muslim states and recaptured the holy city of Jerusalem from the crusaders.