Nepal government cuts cash for king

Budget presented to parliament makes no provisions for the royal palace.

    King Gyanendra's fate will be decided after
    polls in November [AFP]

    The king has been under pressure since fiercely-republican Maoists signed a peace deal with mainstream parties last year and entered Kathmandu's corridors of power.

     

    The latest government move adds to signs that he may soon be removed.

     

    "The government has not allocated any money in this year's budget for the king ... the royal budget has been totally scrapped," said Prem Khanal, a senior business reporter at the English-language Kathmandu Post newspaper.

     

    "If any money had been allocated for the palace, it would have been unlikely to have been approved," he said.

     

    Move welcomed

      

    Nepal's Maoists welcomed the scrapping of cash for the palace.

      

    "The tradition of providing an annual allowance to the royal family has been broken and this is a positive sign," Dev Gurung, a Maoist leader and minister, said.

    Gyanendra came to the throne in 2001 in tragic circumstances after an apparently drunk and drugged Crown Prince Dipendra killed most of his family, including the king and queen, and then himself.

      

    Although viewed by loyalists as the reincarnation of a Hindu deity, King Gyanendra lost public support in February 2005 when he sacked the government and assumed direct control.

      

    A 14-month period of dictatorial rule ended in April last year after massive protests organised by sidelined political parties and Maoists rocked the country.

      

    Since the peace deal brought the Maoists into Kathmandu, the king has been stripped of most of his powers.

     

    Gyanendra's fate is set to be decided after polls in November that will elect a body to rewrite Nepal's constitution - and decide whether the 238-year-old monarchy should stay or go.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Many Pentecostal churches in the Niger Delta offer to deliver people from witchcraft and possession - albeit for a fee.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.