Bomber targets Afghan market

At least 14 people killed and dozens wounded in suicide bombing claimed by Taliban.

    International Security Assistance Force troops arriving at the site of the attack in Gardez [AFP]

    "The war against Taliban in Afghanistan was won in 2001," he said.

     

    "We don't have same problem Pakistan is facing today. Look at the mosque in Islamabad. Look at incidents in Karachi, Peshawar, a week ago.

     

    "The Taliban problem is indeed as much or more a problem in Pakistan as perhaps it is in Afghanistan."

     
    Zemarai Bashary, an interior ministry spokesman, said about 40 people were either dead or wounded in the blast in a crowded market and bus stop in the centre of Gardez, capital of Paktia province and 100km south of the capital, Kabul.
     
    Foreign forces
     
    Rahmatullah Rahmat, the governor of Paktia, said the bomber struck as a convoy of foreign forces was passing through the street market.
     
    A spokesman for the US-led coalition said some of its soldiers were wounded, but had no more details.

     

    The International Security Assistance Force, which leads thousands of foreign troops in Afghanistan, had initially said its troops were involved, but later said that report was wrong.

     

    As details emerged about the blast, the governor of Ghazni province said Afghan and Nato forces killed about 30 Taliban fighters and arrested 12 others in Qara Bagh district on Saturday night.

     

    Merajuddin Patan, the governor, told Reuters: "Unfortunately three police are missing and one is wounded."

    The attack in Kunduz on Saturday was aimed at German soldiers who were shopping in a market. The Taliban claimed responsibility.

      

    The Taliban says it will step up suicide attacks across the country to avenge the killing of Mullah Dadullah, its military commander, last week.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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