Struggling to survive 'Bomb Alley'

Al Jazeera spoke to people living on possibly the most targeted road in Afghanistan.

    The suicide attacks usually target Nato troops
    Residents of Kandahar have taken to calling one 2km stretch of road from the airfield to the centre of the city "Bomb Alley" as it is believed to have seen more suicide attacks than any other road in Afghanistan.

    James Bays, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Afghanistan, went to Kandahar to speak to the people who are struggling to make a living in this most dangerous of locations.

    Sanaullah is a carpenter with a workshop on the deadly stretch of road. He suffered injuries to his face and arm in an explosion three months ago.

    "There was two to three American vehicles on the road, there was an explosion and I didn't feel anything after that," he said.

    Sanaullah was lucky to survive. Two children nearby were killed in the attack.

    "We want the foreign troops to stay, but not in town, they should go to the deserts. Every time they come here the suicide bomber follows."
    Most recent attacks have targeted Nato patrols forcing them to rely more on the local police force in order to reduce the threat to civilians.

    "We want the foreign troops to stay, but not in town, they should go to the deserts. Every time they come here the suicide bomber follows," Laal Gul, an Afghan police officer, said.

    There were nearly 140 suicide bombings across Afghanistan in 2006, according to the US military, and the birthplace of the Taliban witnessed many of them.

    Tariq Reshad, a local doctor, described the scene as he rushed to give to give first aid after one attack.

    "A piece of body was there, and one foot was there, and another hand was there, it was a very bad situation," he told Al Jazeera.

    Security is tight along the street but the residents have said that despite the danger life has to go on. 

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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