Setbacks to Nepal negotiations

Government and maoist forces blame each other as they struggle to reach a deal.

    Party activists held victory rallies after signing the peace agreement with the government
    Curbs on weapons
     
    Under the settlement it was decided that in the run up to next year's constituent assembly elections the Maoists would restrict their 35,000 fighters to 28 camps and store their weapons in seven cantonments.
     
    In return, the government will also confine its 90,000-strong army to its barracks and lock up an equal number of weapons.
     
    The UN will supervise the management of weapons on both sides.
     
    The agreement also made provision for the Maoists to join the mainstream government on December 1.
     
    On Sunday, Prachanda, the Maoist leader, met with Girija Prasad Koirala, the Nepalese prime minister, but it was not clear what was discussed.
     
    The peace agreement, reached on November 8, formally ended Nepal's civil war in which more than 13,000 people were killed in over ten years of fighting.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    We explore how Salah Ed-Din unified the Muslim states and recaptured the holy city of Jerusalem from the crusaders.