Philippines typhoon death toll tops 6,000

Typhoon Haiyan is the deadliest natural disaster on record in the Philippines, with bodies still being found each day.

    Philippines typhoon death toll tops 6,000
    Thousands of homes were destroyed, and will take years to rebuild [Reuters]

    The death toll from Typhoon Haiyan that struck the central Philippines on November 8 has passed 6,000 with nearly 1,800 people missing, officials have said.

    Twenty-seven bodies, all unidentified, were among the latest to be recovered under debris in typhoon-stricken coastal areas including the hardest hit city of Tacloban, said Major Reynaldo Balido, the spokesman for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council on Friday.

    The overnight tally pushed the overall death toll to 6,009 while 1,779 others remain unaccounted for, the government agency said, making the typhoon the deadliest natural disaster on record to hit the Philippines.

    Balido said that 20 to 30 bodies were still being found every day.

    Identifying cadavers in the advanced stage of decomposition and matching them with the missing is a difficult process and the reason why the number of the missing remains unchanged, he said.

    Home flattened

    The homes of more than 16 million people were either flattened or damaged by the typhoon, and officials said rebuilding will take at least three years.

    Social Welfare Secretary Corazon Soliman said that temporary bunkhouses and emergency shelters were being constructed and residents given cash in exchange for work, including repacking and hauling relief goods.

    "We will provide materials to rebuild their houses, however, we stressed to the local governments that new shelters have to be built 40 meters away from the shoreline on high tide," she said.

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'Money can't buy us': Mapping Canada's oil pipeline battle

    'Money can't buy us': Mapping Canada's oil pipeline battle

    We travel more than 2,000km and visit communities along the route of the oil pipeline that cuts across Indigenous land.

    Women under ISIL: The wives

    Women under ISIL: The wives

    Women married to ISIL fighters share accounts of being made to watch executions and strap explosives to other women.

    Diplomats for sale: How an ambassadorship was bought and lost

    Diplomats for sale: How an ambassadorship was bought and lost

    The story of Ali Reza Monfared, the Iranian who tried to buy diplomatic immunity after embezzling millions of dollars.