Top prosecutor quits Khmer Rouge tribunal

Andrew Cayley says he is resigning from financially-troubled UN-backed court for personal reasons.

    Two former Khmer Rouge leaders are currently being tried for crimes against humanity and war crimes [Al Jazeera]
    Two former Khmer Rouge leaders are currently being tried for crimes against humanity and war crimes [Al Jazeera]

    A top prosecutor at Cambodia's UN-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal has announced that he will resign from his job next week.

    UN-appointed co-prosecutor Andrew Cayley said in a statement on Monday that he is resigning from the financially-troubled court for personal reasons.

    About 140 Cambodian employees at the court have been striking since early September to demand salaries that have not been paid for months.

    Cayley said he hoped the court would resolve its financial issues so the trial could proceed efficiently.

    A tribunal spokesman said Cayley's departure was not expected to cause any disruptions and a temporary replacement was expected in October.

    The tribunal is tasked with seeking justice for atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge in the late 1970s, when an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians died.

    The tribunal is currently trying two former Khmer Rouge leaders, former head of state Khieu Samphan, 82, and chief ideologue Nuon Chea, 87, for crimes against humanity, war crimes, genocide and other offenses.

    Leng Sary, another defendant, died in March during the trial.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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