Legacy of North Korean film festival lives on

Critics say biennial film festival, which started in 1987 in Pyongyang, is government propaganda.

    North Korea's late leader Kim Jong il was known for his love of films - among other things.
     
    He even kidnapped one of South Korea's most famous directors to help establish a film industry. 

    So it's perhaps no surprise that part of his legacy is a film festival, which has been held every two years since 1987. But critics say the event is being used as a propaganda to mask North Korea's brutal dictatorship. 
     
    This year it's being studied closely for signs of change under the new leadership of Kim Jong-un.  

    Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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