South Korea government faces media anger

Striking TV journalists protest online in runup to the country's crucial general elections.



    South Koreans go to the polls next week in a vote that is expected to be one of the most closely contested general elections in years.

    However, the vote comes in amid a strike joined most recently by seasoned media practitioners from the country's largest television network, the Korean Broadcasting System (KBS), who say their freedoms - and thus their work - are being compromised by government interference and control.

    They say Lee Myung Bak's administration selects the channels’ senior executives, who in turn prevent reporting that criticises the government.

    While everyone does not agree with their sentiment, these media personnel have taken their work and protest online to tell what they say is the "truth".

    Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett reports from Seoul.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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