South Korea voters look to independent voices

Seeking change, voters are taking unorthodox decision to back independents in 2012.

    In the run-up to next year's general and presidential elections, the South Korean government has come under increasing scrutiny amid allegations of the administration running the country as a business.

    The nation faces a number of challenging paradoxes: the economy is growing but inflation is painfully high; unemployment is down but jobs are temporary and badly paid.

    Many voters say they are disillusioned with the two main parties and, unusually for South Korea, intend to support independent candidates.

    Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett reports from Seoul.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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