Cambodia Angkor park risks collapse

Angkor archaeological park is at risk of collapse due to excessive use of underground water.



    Angkor archaeological park is one of Cambodia's most beloved destinations, the solid stone ruins of Angkor sit atop a huge reservoir of underground water.

    For centuries this water has kept the sandy soil firm and the monuments steady, but as tourists flood to these temples, the water has been used to supply the rapidly expanding tourist city of Siem Reap.

    The crowds are literally sucking the ground out from under Angkor Wat and its temples, with potentially dire consequences.

    The stone is already cracking under the strain of water being drained from the earth.
    Experts are seeing the towers move before their eyes.

    If the Government still use underground water, in the future, the momument can be subsided and collapse.

    Al Jazeera's Aella Callan reports from Cambodia.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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