Indonesian jailed for hotel attacks

Court sentences man to eight years over twin suicide bombings of Jakarta hotels in 2009.

    Amir Abdillah was found guilty of conspiracy over the twin hotel bombings in Jakarta in 2009 [Reuters]

    They said he had driven Noordin to meetings with terrorists, booked a room in West Java where the hotel attacks were planned and transported explosive materials to a house where a truck bomb was being assembled for an attack on Yudhoyono's presidential convoy.

    In depth


    Profile
     
    Who was Noordin Mohammed Top?
    Timeline
     Indonesia bombings
    Focus
     Indonesia's war on Jemaah Islamiyah
    Video
     Witness to Jakarta bombing
     Jakarta blast caught on tape
     Indonesia's young people under threat

    The truck bomb was intended for an attack around Indonesia's independence day on August 17 last year, but it never took place.

    Amir, 35, was the third person to be sentenced for the July 17, 2009, bomb attacks at the Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott hotels.

    The same court had previously jailed Saefudin Zuhri, an in-law of Noordin, and Aris Susanto, who was sentenced to eight years for assisting and harbouring Noordin and two other suspects.

    Nordin was killed with the other suspects in raids by anti-terror squads in September, two months after the hotel bombings.

    Prosecutors had sought 10 years' jail for Amir, who indicated after the court sentencing that he would not appeal the decision.

    "I don't understand the law but I accept the verdict," Amir told reporters.

    Judges said they had imposed a lighter sentence than sought by prosecutors because Amir had cooperated with police and shown regret.

    Indonesia has battled groups with links to al-Qaeda since 2002, when a bomb attack on a nightclub district on the island of Bali killed 202 people, most of them foreigners.

    Since then, a regional security crackdown has seen hundreds of suspected JI members killed or captured and convicted.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.