Japan improves relations with Ainu

After a long history of discrimination, Tokyo changes attitude toward the Ainu people.

    Japan's government has begun a new process aimed at making amends for the mistreatment of its islands' indigenous people - the Ainu.

    Land was annexed by Japan from the Ainu people in the 19th century, which then imposed laws banning their language, hunting and religious practices.

    The Ainu were only recognized as Japan’s indigenous people in 2008 - after a long history of discrimination and cultural suppression.

    Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett reports from Hokkaido, where most Ainu live, on the struggle to save their way of life.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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