N Korea 'sought Obama invite'

Pyongyang asked to send envoy to Obama inauguration, South Korean media says.

    Kim has been the North's senior envoy to six-nation talks on the country's nuclear programme [EPA]

    US officials have made no comment on Pyongyang's reported request.

    Yu Myung-hwan, South Korea's foreign minister, was quoted as saying he was aware of the proposal, but "I understand things are not going that way".

    No diplomatic relations

    Preparations are well underway for Obama's inauguration to be held on January 20 [AFP]
    Last week however, the US state department informed foreign embassies in Washington that ambassadors and spouses would be allowed to attend the inauguration as representatives of their countries, but any other foreign leaders would be excluded from the event.

    "These invitations are only for the chiefs of diplomatic missions and their spouses and are not transferable," Condoleezza Rice, the US secretary of state, wrote in a diplomatic note sent to embassies on January 6.

    North Korea does not have diplomatic relations with the US and as such has no embassy in Washington.

    Disarmament

    Efforts to end North Korea's nuclear weapons programmes will be one of the leading foreign policy issues in Obama's in-tray when he takes office.

    Six nation talks on the issue - involving the US, China, Russia, Japan and North and South Korea - have been dogged by delays and disputes over measures to verify the North's disarmament.

    But analysts have said the incoming president is likely to take a significantly different tack on North Korea to that pursued by the Bush administration.

    During last year's US election campaign, Obama suggested that he was willing to sit down for one-on-one talks with North Korean leaders if it would lead to a breakthrough on the issue.

    Bush, who famously added North Korea to his "axis of evil" states, repeatedly ruled out bilateral talks with the North, saying any negotiations on the nuclear issue could only be discussed with North Korea's neighbours under the six nation format.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.