China hits back at Dalai Lama

Commentary in state media says Tibetan leader trying to win sympathy for independence.

    The Chinese government says the Dalai Lama is trying to split Tibet from China [Reuters]

    Responding to his remarks, Tuesday's Xinhua commentary said the Dalai Lama had resorted to "betrayed facts" which it said were "aimed at arousing concerns over Tibet to add weight to his separatist ambitions."

    It accused the Dalai Lama of undermining talks with the Chinese government by ignoring what it said were "concrete, simple, reasonable and explicit" requirements laid down by Beijing.

    'Pathetic posture'

    The Dalai Lama says the March riots were a sign of growing frustration among Tibetans [AFP]

    "By stressing his 'disappointment' over the contacts and negotiations, the Dalai Lama deliberately adopted a pathetic posture only in an attempt to draw public attention and sympathy," the commentary said.

    "His 'disappointment' also showed his reluctance to give up his stance to seek 'Tibetan independence'" it added.

    The Xinhua commentary, entitled "Dalai Lama's remarks add to his mistakes", comes as Tibetan envoys are in Beijing this week preparing for a fresh round of talks with the Chinese government.

    Previous meetings have made little substantive progress and on Monday the Dalai Lama said he was increasingly doubtful the meetings would ever produce any breakthrough.

    The Chinese government accuses the Dalai Lama of instigating unrest in Tibet which led to riots in the region in March, and of encouraging secessionist ambitions in Tibet.

    The 73-year-old Nobel peace laureate has called a meeting later this month of Tibetan exile groups to decide on a future strategy towards the Chinese government.

    The meeting in Dharamshala in northern India will look at re-evaluating the so-called "middle path" policy with China, backed by the Dalai Lama, which espouses "meaningful autonomy" for Tibet.

    Many younger, more radical Tibetan activists are increasingly demanding a push for full independence.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and Agencies


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