Cambodia fighters jailed for murder

Court convicts four men of murdering a UK charity worker and his translator.

    Four of the five men were jailed
    for up to 20 years [AFP]

    Their remains were found in 1998, the same year Cambodia's civil war ended when the Khmer Rouge movement disintegrated.

    'Brutal murder'

    All five of the men sentence on Tuesday - Khem Ngun, Puth Lim, Loch Mao, Sin Dorn and Cheap Chet - were arrested over the past year, nearly a decade after a joint investigation into the incident by British and Cambodian police.

    Khem Ngun, Puth Lim and Loch Mao, were each sentenced to 20 years in prison, while Sin Dorn was jailed for 10 years.

    Iv Kim Sri, the presiding judge, also ordered the men jointly to pay $10,000 to the families of the victims.

    The British government and the Mines Advisory Group charity, for which the two dead men worked, welcomed the verdict, saying their families were "extremely satisfied with today's outcome".

    "Today, we feel that justice has been done for our two colleagues who were brutally murdered whilst carrying out life-saving work," Lou McGrath, a Mines Advisory Group executive, said in a statement issued at the court.

    Bill Rammell, a UK junior foreign minister, said: "I welcome the guilty verdicts and sentences handed down  today by a Cambodian court in the trial of those responsible. The verdict brings to an end 12 years of uncertainty for their families."


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Meet the deported nurse aiding asylum seekers at US-Mexico border

    Meet the deported nurse helping refugees at the border

    Francisco 'Panchito' Olachea drives a beat-up ambulance around Nogales, taking care of those trying to get to the US.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.