Fiji ends state of emergency

Military-led government lifts emergency powers imposed last month.

    Bainimarama said Qarase's government was corrupt and too soft on those involved in the 2000 coup
    He said the emergency powers, which included allowing the military to detain people without charge, would be lifted on Saturday, adding there was "no reason" to prolong them.
     
    The imposition of the state of emergency was condemned by the European Union, the US and Fiji's Pacific neighbours, Australia and New Zealand.
     
    The move had led to threats that aid would be cut.
     
    Interim government
     
    Fiji's interim government first lifted emergency measures imposed after the bloodless coup in May, in return for about $247 million in European aid.
     
    Fiji's military chief Frank Bainimarama overthrew Qarase's government last December claiming his administration was corrupt and too soft on those responsible for a previous coup in 2000.
     
    Qarase has lived in exile on the remote Lau group of islands since the coup, but returned to the capital Suva in September - a move which prompted Bainimarama to reimpose the state of emergency.
     
    Bainimarama, who has proclaimed himself interim prime minister, accused Qarase of "irresponsible and inciteful" behaviour and threatened to send him back into exile.
     
    Qarase started court action this week challenging the legality of the current administration.
     
    Despite widespread international condemnation of last year's coup, Fiji's military chief has refused to relinquish power or set a date for fresh elections.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.