Ship capsizes in eastern Indonesia

At least two children dead and dozens more missing in latest sea disaster.

    Sea transportation is a vital link in the vast archipelago but safety standards are suspect [AFP]
    Karim Tuanaya, acting head of the local port authority, said on Thursday the ship's engine broke down after encountering five-metre-high waves.
     
    He said rescuers were losing hope of finding more survivors, especially with rain and huge waves hampering the search.
     
    "The problem is that the sea remains rough with waves up to four metres high, while the weather has kept visibility very low," he added.
     
    Safety fears
     
    Tuanaya said the 29 people who had life vests on were plucked from the sea by a passing oil tanker, which also pulled out the bodies of two children from the sea and is assisting in the rescue operations.
     
    Indonesia has suffered a series of air and sea accidents in recent months, and low safety standards have been blamed for most of them.
     
    In late December last year, a passenger ferry carrying around 600 people sank in a storm in the Java Sea, killing more than 300 people.
     
    In February, another ferry caught fire northwest of the capital, Jakarta, and later sank with investigators and journalists on board.
     
    The government has said it is considering new regulations banning old ships and aircraft from service.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.