Thailand freezes Thaksin accounts

Committee orders $1.6bn frozen until court decides if money was obtained illegally.

    Thaksin supporters have been holding a series of rallies demanding a return to democracy [Reuters]

    The committee was set up by the military-installed government after last September's coup which overthrew Thaksin.

     

    The coup leaders have accused the former prime minister, who made his fortune in telecommunications, of corruption and abuse of power.

     

    In a listing last July of Thailand's richest people, US-based Forbes magazine put Thaksin and his family in fourth place with an estimated fortune of $2.2bn.

     

    'Political decision'

     

    Noppadol Pattama, Thaksin's lawyer and de facto spokesman in Thailand, said the move to freeze the accounts was "just another political decision to persecute the former prime minister".

     

    He said Thaksin "feels that he and his wife have been unfairly and illegally treated by the AEC, and will fight and defend his innocence by bringing legal action in criminal and civil cases claiming compensation for loss of opportunity".

     

    Noppadol said Thaksin would disclose the source of funds in every account named by the AEC.

     

    The former prime minister was abroad at the time of the coup, and has not returned to Thailand since.

     

    He has been warned by the military not to return until after a general election planned for December, because of fears he could destabilise the political situation.

     

    Meanwhile English Premier League club Manchester City have said that in the wake of the asset seizure they were seeking clarification from Thaksin over his proposed $200m takeover of the football club.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.