Rival concedes to ex-rebel in Aceh

Former governor says Irwandi Yusuf won the most votes in the December 11 poll.

    Irwandi, seen casting his vote, says he will wait until official results are out before declaring victory

    Irwandi is a former spokesman for the Free Aceh Movement (GAM) and negotiator in peace talks with Jakarta.
     
    Two surveys have indicated that Irwandi nabbed the most number of votes in a field of eight candidates, with Azwar probably in third or fourth place.
     
    Azwar was interim governor several months before and after the massive 2004 tsunami that left about 170,000 dead or missing and 500,000 homeless in the province of four million.
     
    He was endorsed by two Muslim parties and appeared poised to take back his office.
     
    Some two million people voted in Monday’s election, which will decide the governorship and other top posts around the province.
     
    The elections come after a peace deal went into effect on August 15, 2005 to end almost three decades of fighting between the Indonesian army and GAM that killed 15,000.
     
    The tsunami - burdening the conflict-ravaged land with more carnage - triggered the peace deal.
     
    As the races wrap up, attention will turn to economic development in one of Indonesia’s most impoverished provinces.
     
    Sidney Jones, an analyst with the International Crisis Group, said: "It’s going to be a test to see whether GAM leaders can deliver more benefits and better benefits than previous officials."
     
    One GAM sympathiser, who almost lost his life after being beaten by soldiers in the conflict and had lost his house to the tsunami, said he supported Irwandi’s rise.
     
    "But he also must also provide us with houses and jobs," he said.
     
    Irwandi has said that he will wait until the official results - expected to be announced in early January - to declare victory.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.