Thais keep north under martial law

Military government to lift emergency law in Bangkok and 40 provinces.


    Several military personnel have been
    appointed to top commercial posts

    The government, calling itself the Council for National Security (CNS), has often referred to "undercurrents" in the predominantly rural and impoverished north, as justification for its continuation of martial law.
     
    However, it has not produced strong evidence of potential uprisings in favour of Thaksin.
     
    The Thai public has become increasingly sceptical of the CNC's promises to restore democracy and weed out corruption.
     
    Several military personnel have been appointed to top commercial posts and the CNC has instructed the information ministry to "filter" the internet.
     
    On the second day of the coup the interim government promised to restore democracy within a year and make fighting corruption a top priority.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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