Venezuela wins Guinness record for lightning

Northwestern region awarded title after Guinness Book of World Records recorded 3,600 lightning bolts per hour.

    The certification was handed out by Guinness Book of World Records representative Johanna Hesslin [GALLO/GETTY]
    The certification was handed out by Guinness Book of World Records representative Johanna Hesslin [GALLO/GETTY]

    A Guinness record for the place with the most lightning has been given to an area in Venezuela that recorded 3,600 flashes per hour.

    The certification was handed out on Tuesday by Guinness Book of World Records representative Johanna Hessling.

    The natural phenomenon in the northwestern state of Zulia is called the Catatumbo Lightning, which generates myriad electrical storms from April to November at the mouth of the River Catatumbo, at the southern end of Lake Maracaibo.

    The numbers of lightning bolts are remarkable, an estimated 18 to 60 per minute, up to 3,600 per hour and 1.2 million a year, with each flash packing enough energy to light up 100 million light bulbs, according to the Agencia Venezolana de Noticias.

    Venezuelan Vice President Jorge Arreaza received the certificate from the Guinness representatives.

    The phenomenon was proposed to Guinness last year by a Venezuelan environmentalist named Erick Quiroga, who has been monitoring the lightning for 17 years.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months