Twitter valued at $18bn ahead of trading

Shares in social media company to open at $26 each as trading on the New York Stock Exchange begins on Thursday.

    Twitter has set a price of $26 for its initial public offering of stock, which means the company's shares can begin trading on Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange.

    The price values Twitter at more than $18bn based on its outstanding stock, options and restricted stock that will be available after the IPO.

    The pricing means the San Francisco-based short messaging service will raise $1.8bn in the offering, before expenses.

    Twitter, which has never turned a profit in its seven years of existence, originally set a price range of $17 to $20 per share for the IPO, but that was designed to temper expectations. It was widely expected that the price range would go higher.

    In August, for example, the company priced some of its employee stock options at $20.62, based on an appraisal by an investment firm.

    On Monday, Twitter raised the price range to $23 and $25 per share, signalling an enthusiastic response from prospective investors. 

    The company is offering 70 million shares in the IPO, plus an option to buy another 10.5 million. 

    It is set to begin trading on Thursday morning under the symbol "TWTR".

    Avoiding Facebook mistakes

    Twitter lets users send short messages, or "tweets", in 140-character bursts and has attracted world leaders, religious icons and celebrities, along with CEOs. 

    It now has more than 230 million users, more than three-quarters of them outside the US.

    Twitter's public debut is the most highly anticipated IPO since Facebook's in May 2012.

    But Twitter has valued itself at just a fraction of Facebook and has sought to cool expectations.

    The company is likely hoping its stock will avoid the fate Facebook's shares, which didn't surpass their IPO price until more than a year after their offering.

    Twitter also has tried to avoid the trouble that plagued Facebook's IPO, which was marred by technical glitches on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange.

    As a result, the Securities and Exchange Commission fined Nasdaq $10mn, the largest ever levied against an exchange. Those problems likely led Twitter to the New York Stock Exchange.

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months