San Francisco 'saved' by pint-sized Batkid

Leukemia sufferer Miles Scott gets day to remember as city fulfills superhero dream in series of crime-fighting stunts.

    A five-year-old leukemia sufferer has fulfilled a wish to be a superhero after San Francisco, a charity and city residents came together to let him play crime-fighting 'Batkid' for a day.

    With the help of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, volunteers and city officials, Miles Scott was given an adventure to remember, capturing the Riddler and thwarting the Penguin in a series of orchestrated stunts organised for him by volunteers and city officials.

    Miles, from Tulelake in northern California, didn't know what was in store for him and thought he was in San Francisco on Friday to get a Batman costume so he could dress like his favourite superhero.

    Miles Scott, aka the Batkid.

    Instead, his day started with a television appeal from the city's police chief, Greg Suhr, and ended with him aiding a grown-up Batman stop Gotham City's most fiendish criminals.

    "Please, Caped Crusader. We need you. And bring the Batkid," said Suhr in a televised mock appeal. 

    The bashful Miles at first seemed overwhelmed, quietly working through scenarios with an adult Batman sidekick, such as defusing a fake bomb and saving a woman, as crowds in their thousands chanted of "Batkid, Batkid". 

    The Batkid was given a police escort as he sped around the city in a black Lamborghini "Batmobile", which was decorated with a large Batman insignia.

    By the time he reached City Hall to receive a key to the city in front of the biggest crowd of the day, Miles was all smiles.

    It seemed that everyone was in on the surprise. At Union Square, the Chronicle newspaper distributed hundreds of copies of a special edition with the headline "Batkid Saves City".

    Batkid forever

    San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee later proclaimed November 15 to be "Batkid Day Forever" and the US president, Barack Obama, said in a message: "Way to go, Miles! Way to save Gotham!"

    Miles was diagnosed with leukemia when he was 18 months old, but ended treatments in June and is in remission.

    Miles' father Nick Scott thanked the crowd, organisers and the city.

    "This is closure for us," Nick Scott said. "It has been a hard three years."

    Make-A-Wish has fulfilled similar wishes across the US. One child became Batman's sidekick, Robin and another was a secret agent, said Jen Wilson, a spokeswoman for the organisation.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.