Armstrong to address doping scandal on Oprah

Cyclist to appear on US network to break his silence on lifetime ban from sport for use of performance-enhancing drugs.

    Armstrong to address doping scandal on Oprah
    Armstrong has always denied charges of doping and has never been proven to have tested positive [GALLO/GETTY]

    Lance Armstrong will break his silence about his lifetime ban from cycling and the doping charges made against him in a televised interview with Oprah Winfrey next week, the television producer has announced.

    The interview, to be broadcast on the Oprah Winfrey Network on Janauary 17, will be the first the US cyclist has conducted since receiving his ban and being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

    "Armstrong will address the alleged doping scandal, years of accusations of cheating, and charges of lying about the use of performance-enhancing drugs throughout his storied cycling career," the network said in a statement on Tuesday.

    On Saturday, the New York Times reported that Armstrong, 41, had told associates and anti-doping officials he was considering an admission of using banned drugs.

    The newspaper said Armstrong hoped to persuade anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which the Texan is currently subject to a lifetime ban.

    However, Armstrong's lawyer Tim Herman later told USA Today that there had been no talks with anti-doping bodies about any admission.

    Armstrong has always vehemently denied charges of doping and has never been proven to have tested positive.

    An October 10 report from the US anti-doping body USADA cited Armstrong's involvement in what it characterised as the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping program that sport has ever seen," involving anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, blood transfusions and other doping.

    Less than two weeks later, Armstrong's seven Tour de France victories were nullified and he was banned from cycling for life after the International Cycling Union ratified the USADA's sanctions against him.

    In November, Armstrong, a survivor of testicular cancer, stepped down as a board member of Livestrong, the cancer-support charity he founded in 1997.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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