Fresh curfews amid Jamaica unrest

At least 10 people killed in gang violence shortly after state of emergency lifted.

    The last curfew was imposed during a manhunt for Christopher Coke earlier this year [File: EPA]

    Last year, dozens of Tredegar Park residents fled their homes during gang clashes before soldiers arrived and arrested about 100 people.

    A state of public emergency imposed during the manhunt for drug lord Christopher "Dudus" Coke in May was only recently lifted.

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    The alleged drug kingpin sparked a mini-war, which left at least 76 people dead, as he tried to elude capture.

    Coke, 42, is currently being held in the United States to face charges of conspiracy to distribute marijuana and cocaine and conspiracy to illegally traffic in firearms.

    US prosecutors describe him as the leader of the "Shower Posse" that murdered hundreds of people during the cocaine wars of the 1980s.

    Jamaica is the largest producer of marijuana in the Caribbean region. Gangs tied to the trade have become powerful organised-crime networks involved in international gun smuggling.

    The drug trade has also fuelled one of the world's highest murder rates, with Jamaica experiencing about 1,660 homicides last year among a population of just 2.8 million people.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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