Alleged Jamaica drug lord arrested

Wanted by the US, Christopher "Dudus" Coke caught month after hunt for him turned deadly.

    At least 73 people were killed when troops attempted to arrest Coke last month [EPA]

    But the Al Miller, an influential evangelical preacher who facilitated the surrender of Coke's brother earlier this month, told the Associated Press news agency that Coke was prepared to surrender to authorities at the US embassy in Kingston when police stopped his vehicle on a highway outside the capital.

    'Wanted to surrender'

    "A contact was made on his behalf that he wanted to give himself in," Miller said. "I therefore made arrangements with his lawyers because he wanted to go ahead with the extradition process, so we communicated with the US embassy because that's where he would feel more comfortable."

    IN DEPTH

     

      Profile: Christopher Coke
      Music and murder
      Drug gangs 'call shots'

    Miller said police captured Coke on the way to the embassy and then took him to the nearby Spanish Town police headquarters.

    Miller said Coke contacted him to ask his help in arranging the surrender at the embassy because he did not trust the police not to harm him if he surrendered to them.

    "He also wanted to waive his right to an extradition hearing so that he could go to the US for a trial," said Miller, a minister at the nondenominational Whole Life Ministry.

    US prosecutors have described Coke as the current leader of the "Shower Posse" that murdered hundreds of people by showering them with bullets during the cocaine wars of the 1980s.

    Coke was known as "president" to the people of his slum, serving as community leader and enforcer in the gritty neighbourhood in an area that the government acknowledges it has long neglected.

    He also commanded a private militia and was a strong supporter of the ruling Jamaica Labour party.

    Jamaica initially refused requests to extradite him to New York for trial after his indictment last year, and the case had strained relations between the US and Jamaica.

    But the government tried to arrest him last month and in recent days offered a $60,000 reward for information leading to his arrest.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.