Peru's animal-trade problem

Despite tough laws, not a single trafficker has served any time behind bars in the country.



    From monkeys to macaws, private collectors can get their hands on most endangered animals, if they are willing to pay the price.

    The trafficking of wild animals generates some $20bn a year worldwide.

    Under Peruvian law, anyone caught with an endangered animal is liable to be punished by a prison term.

    Yet while rare animals live in cages, not a single human trafficker has served any time behind bars.

    Is Peru losing the battle against this illegal trade? 

    Jennifer Bragg reports from Peru.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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