Fujimori admits corruption charges

Former Peru president tells court he is guilty of spying, embezzlement and bribery.

    Fujimori has already received a 25-year prison
    term for murder and kidnapping [AFP]

    Keiko Fujimori, who is leading some opinion polls as the election approaches, has said that she will grant her father a pardon if elected.

    Wiretapping claims

    Pelaez charged Fujimori with ordering Vladimiro Montesinos, a former intelligence chief, to use state funds to secretly monitor 28 politicians, journalists and businessmen.

    Fujimori was also accused of authorising bribes to be paid to 13 congressmen so that they would join his party, and allegedly bought off a TV station and a newspaper editorial board to support his re-election campaign in 2000.

    Montesinos, who is serving a 20-year term for bribery and selling weapons to Colombian rebels, said during his own trials that he made the payments on Fujimori's behalf.

    Fujimori has insisted that the he knew nothing of the money.

    Repayments urged

    Prosecutors say that Fujimori should pay $1.7m to the state and $1m to be split among the 28 people whose phone lines were illegally tapped.

    Fujimori, who was extradited to Peru from Chile in 2007, has so far been convicted by a three-member panel of crimes against humanity for authorising military death squads, abuses of power, and of embezzlement.

    In the embezzlement trial, in which he was found guilty of paying $15m in state funds to Montesinos, he admitted responsibility but said that he later repaid the money.

    Cesar Nakazaki, Fujimori's lawyer, told the court on Monday that his client had not received a fair and impartial hearing.

    Fujimori is appealing against his previous convictions.

    Fujimori first became president in 1990 in a democratic election but became increasingly authoritarian during his government's campaign against left-wing armed groups.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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