Judge halts Guantanamo trial

Decision brings detention camp's cases into compliance with Obama's executive order.

    Al-Qaeda claimed it carried out the bombing of the USS Cole, that left 17 US sailors dead [AP]

    The charges against al-Nashiri marked the last active Guantanamo military tribunal, bringing all cases into compliance with Obama's January 22 executive order to halt  court proceedings at the detention centre in Cuba.

    The hearing had been set for Monday.

    Death penalty

    Last year the Bush administration charged al-Nashiri with "organising and directing" the bombing and planned to seek the death penalty in the case.

    "We have already waited eight years. Justice delayed is justice denied. We must allow the military commission process to go forward"

    Retired Navy Cmdr Kirk S. Lippold, commanding officer of the USS Cole

    Al-Nashiri said he confessed to helping plot the USS Cole bombing only because he was tortured by US interrogators.

    The CIA has admitted he was among terrorist suspects subjected to waterboarding, which simulates drowning while being interrogated in secret CIA prisons.

    Obama met the families of victims of the USS Cole bombing as well as the September 11, 2001, attacks, on Friday to discuss his plans regarding Guantanamo. Some families of victims have opposed his decision.

    "I was certainly disappointed with the decision to delay the military commissions process," Retired Navy Commander Kirk S. Lippold, the commanding officer of the Cole when it was bombed in Yemen in 2000, said.

    "We have already waited eight years. Justice delayed is justice denied. We must allow the military commission process to go forward."

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.