US jet crash inquiry continues

Aircraft pulled from New York river days after narrow escape for more than 155 passengers.

    Dozens of people stopped to watch the
    aircraft being pulled from the Hudson [AFP]

    Sullenberger said after the crash that he made a split-second decision to land in the river instead of risking a "catastrophic" crash in a populated area on either bank.

    Pulled out of water

    The aircraft was lifted by crane from the Hudson at the southern tip of Manhattan.

    Its shredded underbelly could be seen and pieces of metal from the jet fell as it was moved to ground.

    Dozens of onlookers took pictures of the wreckage, whose damaged right engine was clearly visible.

    Divers were still searching for the left engine, using sonar equipment as assistance.

    It was not immediately said where the aircraft would be taken.

    'Primary targets'

    Radar data has confirmed that the aircraft crossed the path of a group of "primary targets", almost certainly birds, as the Airbus A320 rose over the Bronx after taking off, the National Transportation Safety Board said.

    Flight 1549 was en route to Charlotte, North Carolina, when the crash occurred.

    The jet initially sank up to its windows.

    Rescuers using coast guard vessels and ferries opened the door and pulled passengers out.

    Temperatures were at about -6.7C, one of the coldest days of the year.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    I remember the day … I designed the Nigerian flag

    In 1959, a year before Nigeria's independence, a 23-year-old student helped colour the country's identity.