Chile judge orders Fujimori arrest

Former Peruvian president to be held under house arrest pending extradition case.

    Fujimori says he will make no attempt to flee Chile pending the outcome of his extradition case [AP]

    "I'm leading a totally normal life, following instructions from my lawyers and friends"

    Alberto Fujimori, former Peru president

    The former Peruvian leader has been detained in Chile since late 2005, awaiting the outcome of the extradition case.

     

    On Thursday, a Chilean state prosecutor submitted a report to the supreme court recommending Fujimori's extradition.

     

    The report will be passed to judge Orlando Alvarez, who must decide whether Fujimori should be sent to Peru.

     

    Alvarez's ruling, which is expected within weeks, can be appealed by the defence or the prosecution.

     

    Peru charges

     

    Peru accuses Fujimori of embezzling $15m and using excessive anti-terrorism measures during his 1990-2000 presidency.

     

    Fujimori spent five years in exile in Japan after his government collapsed in 2000.

     

    He was placed under house arrest when he arrived in Chile in 2005, and was freed six months later on condition that he remained there.

     

    The current extradition case is based partly on evidence of two massacres committed in the 1990s when Peru was fighting Shining Path, a Maoist movement.

     

    Peruvian prosecutors say massacres were carried out by death squads linked to Fujimori's government.

     

    Fujimori denies all of the charges against him.

     

    "I'm leading a totally normal life, following instructions from my lawyers and friends," he told Chilean media on Thursday.

     

    "I've never thought about escaping [Chile]."

    SOURCE: Agencies


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