Zambia president's remains arrive home

Michael Sata died in a London hospital after a long illness and is to be buried on November 11.

    Zambia president's remains arrive home
    Fresh elections to pick a new president must be held within three months of Sata's death [Reuters]

    The body of president Michael Sata has arrived back on Zambian soil, ahead of a state funeral for the 77-year-old leader who died in hospital after a long illness.

    Sata died on Tuesday while undergoing treatment in London's private King Edward VII hospital for an unspecified condition.

    Mourners, some carrying pictures of Sata, gathered at the main Lusaka airport before the arrival of the plane. Two former Zambian presidents, Kenneth Kaunda and Rupiah Banda, also attended.

    On the tarmac will be a guard of honour, traditional, religious and civic  leaders, as well as a host of cabinet ministers, former presidents and foreign diplomats.

    Security forces were on hand to escort a vehicle carrying Sata's body to a conference center, where family, officials and the public will view the casket in coming days. The burial is scheduled for November 11.

    For months, officials in the southern African nation repeatedly denied that Sata was sick, despite several trips abroad for medical help.

    Fresh elections to pick a new president must be held within three months of Sata's death. Scott is not expected to run.

    The public will be allowed to view the body from Sunday until November 9, and parliament will host a thanksgiving ceremony on November 10.

    Books of condolences have been opened at government offices in the capital, in the provinces and at Zambian embassies abroad.

    Sata will be buried at Embassy Park cemetery, near government offices in Lusaka's Long Acres suburb.

    The graveyard is reserved for heads of state and two of Zambia's former leaders - Frederick Chiluba and Levy Mwanawasa - are buried there.

    SOURCE: AFP And AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    What draws Kenyan women to join al-Shabab and what challenges are they facing when they return to their communities?