Crew kidnapped by Somali pirates in 2010 free

Officials say 11 sailors of the Malaysian-owned cargo vessel MV Albedo arrive safely in Kenya.

    Crew kidnapped by Somali pirates in 2010 free
    According to estimates, Somali piracy netted $160m, and cost the world economy some $7bn in 2011 [EPA]

    Eleven sailors held hostage by Somali pirates for more than three years have arrived safely in Kenya, mediators who helped secure their freedom said.

    The 11 men - from Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Iran - were crew of the Malaysian-owned cargo vessel MV Albedo, which was hijacked 1,500km off the coast of Somalia in November 2010, while sailing from the United Arab Emirates to Kenya.

    Abdi Yusuf Hassan, the interior minister of Somalia's Galmudug region, said on Saturday that the sailors were released with no ransom paid.

    However, John Steed, a former British army colonel who has spent years helping negotiate their release, said the men had "sneaked out a window" to escape their captors.

    "Given what they have been through, they are all in good health," Steed told the AFP news agency after arriving in
    Kenya with the men on a special flight from Somalia.

    After escaping through a window from their pirate prison, the men were rescued by security forces from the northern Somali Galmadug region, Steed said.

    MV Albedo had a 23-man crew when it was attacked by the pirates.

    Seven of the ship's crew were released in 2012 while four others drowned when the ship sank last year.

    Media reports have suggested one hostage was killed soon after the vessel was hijacked.

    Nick Kay, the UN's envoy to Somalia, said the 11 crew would be sent back to their respective countries in coming days.

    Pirate attacks have been launched as far as 3,655km from the Somali coast in the Indian Ocean.

    The number of attacks by Somali pirates has fallen over the last two years due to increased naval patrols and the presence of well-armed security teams on ships.

    According to an American One Earth Future foundation report, Somali piracy in the busy shipping lanes of the Gulf of Aden and the northwestern Indian Ocean netted $160m, and cost the world economy some $7bn in 2011.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months