UN says Joseph Kony's whereabouts known

New report says fugitive LRA leader is hiding in Sudanese-controlled areas of a disputed enclave in South Sudan.

    UN says Joseph Kony's whereabouts known
    Kony waged a brutal guerrilla war against the Ugandan government for nearly two decades [Reuters]

    The UN Security Council has released a new report, saying fugitive rebel leader Joseph Kony is hiding in Sudanese-controlled areas of a disputed enclave in South Sudan bordering both Sudan and the Central African Republic.

    Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) has been the subject of a massive manhunt and is wanted by the International Criminal Court along with several of his commanders for war crimes, including rape and using child soldiers.

    "Credible sources suggest LRA leader Joseph Kony and senior LRA commanders have recently returned to seek safe haven in Sudanese-controlled areas of the enclave," the report said.

    The UN also suggested senior Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) commanders were hiding in northeastern Central African Republic, exploiting the instability in the country to regroup.

    Al Jazeera's James Bays, reporting from the United Nations, said the report showed that despite being reduced in strength, the LRA remained a potent threat and a powerful force.

    Hunt for Kony

    Kony waged a brutal campaign against the Ugandan government for nearly two decades.

    The LRA's rebellion sought to remove the government of President Yoweri Museveni and rule the country according to the Biblical ten commandments.

     Al Jazeera profiles Joseph Kony and the LRA

    Most of the group’s fighters were forcibly recruited into its ranks, and others who refused had their ears, lips and limbs hacked off.

    Despite sustained government offensives, it took Ugandan forces nearly two decades to rein them in.

    After a series of defeats, the LRA fled to neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

    Since 2008, the LRA has killed more than 2,600 civilians and abducted more than 4,000 people, according to Human Rights Watch. The US State Department has placed a $5m reward for information leading to his arrest, transfer, or conviction.

    A 5,000-strong African Union Regional Task Force, supported by 100 US Special Forces, has been hunting Kony and LRA commanders.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months