CAR president promises return to security

Michael Djotodia says he is determined to restore security as violence continues to wreak havoc across country.

    CAR president promises return to security
    The interim president is the first Muslim to lead the Christian-majority CAR [Reuters]

    The Central African Republic's interim president has announced "exceptional measures" designed to quell violence by rebels.

    The statement issued on Tuesday from Michel Djotodia's office did not provide details on the measures, but said that security was a priority for his administration.

    "The president wants to assure the Central African people of his determination to hunt down all criminals, looters, troublemakers, human rights violators and their accomplices," the statement said.

    "Exceptional measures are being taken to restore security," it said.

    Since Djotodia seized power in a coup in March, the remnants of his Seleka rebel coalition have been sowing chaos across the vast nation.

    Government forces are struggling to assert their authority beyond the capital Bangui.

    [Violence in the CAR] threatens to degenerate into a countrywide religious and ethnic divide, with the potential to spiral into an uncontrollable situation

    Ban Ki Moon

    An under-funded and ill-equipped African force has made little impact so far.

    Djotodia is the first Muslim president in the Christian-majority country and some of the recent deadly violence has had sectarian undertones.

    On Tuesday, thousands of villagers fled clashes near the town of Bouca between former rebels and local militias, residents said, increasing concerns about growing violence between Muslims and Christians.

    Ban Ki-moon, UN's Secretary General, said on Monday that one alternative to providing financial and logistical support to the African force was to send up to 9,000 UN peacekeepers.

    In his report to the Security Council, Mr Ban said violence in the CAR "threatens to degenerate into a countrywide religious and ethnic divide, with the potential to spiral into an uncontrollable situation".

    Human Rights Watch said the report clearly suggested that the African force - known as MISCA - was not up to the task and that "only a UN peacekeeping mission can avoid the worst case scenario."

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Death from above: Every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Death from above: Every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Will you push the boundaries or play it safe?

    Will you push the boundaries or play it safe?

    Curate an art exhibition and survive Thailand's censorship crackdown in this interactive game.