Another journalist killed in Somali capital

Radio reporter Mohamed Ibrahim Rage, shot in Mogadishu, is the fifth journalist to be killed in Somalia this year.

    Another journalist killed in Somali capital
    Rage was killed by two gunmen who trailed him to his home, local media said [Reuters]

    A Somali radio station editor says unidentified gunmen have shot dead a journalist in Mogadishu, the fifth to be killed in the country his year.

    Mohamed Abdullahi Haji, a news editor at the state-run radio station, said that gunmen killed Mohamed Ibrahim Rage, who worked for the station, at his home in the capital Sunday. He had reportedly received death threats in the past, and had recently returned to Somalia after living abroad, according to local media.

    Working as a reporter is a dangerous job in Mogadishu. Last year, 18 media workers were killed, most in targeted killings.

    "The supposed improvement in security in Mogadishu is for the time being still very fragile," Reporters Without Borders said in a statement. "The Somali capital continues to be one of the world's most dangerous places for journalists."

    The government has vowed to stop attacks against journalists, but so far little action has been taken.

    Last week suicide bombers and gunmen attacked Mogadishu's main court complex, killing 35 people, including one journalist.

    Last month, a suicide car bomber targeting Mogadishu's intelligence chief killed six people, including a radio report.

    SOURCE: Associated Press


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