South African 'Jub Jub' guilty of murder

Court declares popular hip hop artist and his co-accused guilty of murder of four children in Johannesburg.

    Molemo and Tshabalaladrag crashed into a group of school children during a drag race, killing four children [AFP]
    Molemo and Tshabalaladrag crashed into a group of school children during a drag race, killing four children [AFP]

    A South African court has found a hip hop star guilty of the murder of four schoolchildren in a case that is raising emotions in the country.

    Musician Molemo, popularly known as ‘Jub Jub’ Maarohanye and his co-accused Themba Tshabalala, were found guilty on four counts of murder and two of attempted murder in the Protea Magistrate's Court on Tuesday.

    "The State managed to prove beyond reasonable doubt ... that the accused are guilty on four counts of murder ... two counts of attempted murder," said Magistrate Brian Nemavhidi.

    "The death of the deceased occurred as a result of the driving of those vehicles and as such the accused are convicted of driving their vehicles while under the influence of drugs," he said. 

    The Times newspaper said that 'Jub Jub' Molemo said that he felt remorse for what had happened.

    "I'm really hurt sir, but I will leave that [sentence] up to the justice system," Maarohanye said after he was found guilty.

    "I understand the reaction to my actions. I'm happy this [trial] reached the end and that the families can move forward ... Justice has run its course."

    Maarohanye and Tshabalaladrag crashed into a group of school children on March 8, 2010 during a drag race, killing four children and seriously injuring two.

    Prince Mohube, Mlungisi Cwayi, Andile Mthombeni, and Phomello Masemola, were killed.

    Frank Mlambo and Fumani Mushwana were seriously injured.

    Families of the victims were overwhelmed with emotion after the decision was read, with one woman losing consciousness, according to the South African Press Association.

    They will be sentenced in November.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Where are all the women leaders?

    Where are all the women leaders?

    Kamala Harris makes history as US vice presidential candidate, but barriers remain for women in power around the world.

    Inside Baltimore's human trafficking industry

    Inside Baltimore's human trafficking industry

    Survivors of sex trafficking and those who investigate it in the city share their stories.

    Senegal's village of women

    Senegal's village of women

    Women in northeast Senegal are using solar-powered irrigation to farm food and halt the encroaching desert.