Niger sees progress with child mortality

Low-cost intervention critical to saving more than 60,000 children every year in West African nation.

    Niger is one of the poorest countries in the world and until recently it also had the worst child mortality rate.
     
    But a new study shows huge improvements in the health of Nigerien mothers and their children.

    In 1998, 22 out of every 100 children in Niger died before the age of five. But by 2009, when the latest survey was done, that figure had already dropped to 12 in every 100. 

    Al Jazeera's Tarek Bazley reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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